Katherine Turpin

Your Professional Branding Strategist

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For the happy-hour averse

start right where you are :: INTERNAL NETWORKING

 

A few weeks ago, while prepping for a Genesys Works training session, I was pondering the program: these interns have a stunning opportunity to start building their professional networks while they’re still in high school. They learn new skills, showcase their work ethic & personalities and pre-pave the way to college internships and full time employment. I was thinking that a really savvy intern would do well to leverage the heck out of this opportunity to network.

Considering the internship program got my brain firing (because traditional external networking brings to mind cringey, superficial chats with strangers at noisy happy hours, juggling business cards, hors d’oeuvres and a wineglass):

What if each of us networked inside our own companies intentionally?
Duh! A ready-made common ground + a shared mission.

So.Simple! Find and get to know people at your company who are outside your normal work trajectory. Get to know them via a committee or project, working shoulder-to-shoulder. Soon they’ll be able to vouch for your shining personality / skills / work ethic / impact. They’ll become a part of your true network, far more likely to help you if/when you need it (and hopefully, you’ll do the same for them!).

In a job that demands every second of your day, adding internal networking might be the last thing you’d choose. But I think getting to know others makes work more fun and rewarding. And who knows where those new connections will lead? So it’s a little bit selfish, in a good way.  I’ve heard of folks who brilliantly (and often innocently) landed great new jobs and built amazing careers through internal networking. Maybe you have, too.

things you can do right now
(besides being great at your job, which speaks for itself):
  • Volunteer to help anywhere it’s needed. Join committees of all kinds.
  • Offer to research / document / investigate / figure out and report back.
  • If something is wanted or needed but doesn’t yet exist, figure it out or create it.
  • Invite someone you don’t know well to have coffee, eat lunch or go for a walk.
  • Make introductions ~ help connect others. Inclusivity is IN!

In my first year at TCF Bank, I signed on for (almost) every opportunity that crossed my path: my department’s FUN committee, the IT Hackathon planning committee; IT book club, IT donut club, IT ambassador group, IT & Friends (volunteer) committee. I even launched a new club, the TCF Travel Junkies.

I didn’t think of it as internal networking at first ~ I just wanted to be a better cultural ambassador. I’ve never been part of so many initiatives before.  The benefits? They’re plentiful: getting to know great people outside my department  = more enjoyment! When I need an answer, it’s easier to find. Or when I want to get something done, I have a friendlier ear. I get to reciprocate, which also feels fantastic.  Not to mention enjoying the results of our efforts. As far as stepping out of my comfort zone? It feels a little awkward at first. And then, it’s 100% satisfying.

“Your network is not people you know; your network is the people you know who are willing to help you.”  ~~ Sol Orwell

A communication tool is helpful (we use Slack). A core group of networking-minded people helps — there are many in my company who are committed to fostering a collaborative culture. They generously share their connections and are a huge help & inspiration. But even if your company isn’t similarly inclined, you can (and should) branch out.

When you work alongside someone, you get to know them in a different way than if you’ve just chatted over drinks at some industry event. And since we  (usually) have just one boss and one team of peers at a time, we exponentially increase the number of people who know our work when we work on initiatives and projects outside our our normal scope.

It takes extra time & effort to be involved, but it also saves time: answers come more quickly. Folks with whom I’ve worked on projects are more likely to jump in when I need help. There’s a sense of fun and camaraderie.

There’s still a ways to go before I know everybody, but the gap is narrower than if I just did my job day in and day out.

Some bad news: you’ll still need to occasionally attend external networking happy hours. But with intentional internal networking, you’ll need it less.  So start building meaningful connections where you are. Get out of your office / cube / comfort zone and GET INVOLVED!!

I help mid-career professionals figure out their brand, get connected, and launch rockets of all kinds.
Want to chat?
Here’s a link to my calendar for a no-strings-attached intro call.

Wait…Job-Hunting is Like DATING?

How to deal with stuck
(because sometimes it feels like it’ll last forever)

Have you ever been doing everything right in a job search and then suddenly and for no apparent reason things came to a screeching halt?

You got your resume & LinkedIn profile all spiffed up, discreetly let a few friends and former co-workers know you were on the market. You found great jobs & applied to them. Had an interview or two, maybe even the promise of an offer. Things were going great. “What’s all the fuss?” you wondered, “This is easy!”

And then, ghosted.

It happens without warming: a search that’s humming along nicely goes silent. Nobody replies to emails (or worse, you get an inane hard-to-interpret reply). Offers are stalled, all activity just STOPS for no reason.

It can be freaky.  Because Waiting is the Worst.

You want to know what you did wrong. Did the market change and now the job’s being done by robots? Naturally, you want to DO something to end the torture and shake things loose.

This probably won’t surprise you, but job hunting is a lot like DATING: it’s designed to rattle you to your core (kidding, not kidding).

But seriously
  1. Don’t take it personally. Stuck happens. Sometimes it has zero to do with you. Hiring is important, but when a company has an ‘all hands on deck’, candidate interviews are the first thing to get pushed back.  So maybe it’s not you, it’s them.
  2. Walk away for a bit. Cosmically, detaching makes you mysterious and alluring. Oh, wait, that’s dating. Well, it’s also true for job-hunting: something magical happens when you stop pushing.
  3. Date around. Give your mission a little time off (you’ll know when you’re ready to get back to it, because your curiosity and enthusiasm will return).
  4. Once you’re not feeling even the slightest bit pissed off or stuck, take a tiny step forward. Do something silly, like applying for a job you’d never consider: zookeeper or barista or dog park attendant.

    See, you have to show yourself it’s not all that heavy and serious. Like “Tag, you’re it”, then you let it go. Forget about it. A playful touch is super important. Like in dating, “I’m interested, but I don’t NEED you.”

  5. Repeat. And keep having fun, staying curious, not being in a rush.
  6. Remind yourself you have valuable skills and that things always work out: yup, even when there seems to be no movement.
    Because you do, and they do.

Those are arugula sprouts, by the way. I love arugula. You know what else? Seeds take time to germinate. Just like the efforts you’re putting into your search (or dating).

We get tons of social cues to push on (damn Puritan work ethic). So it’s not your fault for wanting to muscle through.

But for god’s sake, when you’re stuck, take a break, will you? PS. you’re not really stopping, you’re just pausing. You’re resting a bit to let things unfold in the best possible way.

 

Does your professional brand need some love? Here’s a link to my calendar for a free 15-minute intro conversation.

 

Networking for the Rest of Us

5 Non-Cringe-y Ways to Get Yourself Out There

You’re ready: you’ve got your professional brand tightened up.  Your resume is fine-tuned and your LinkedIn profile represents you well. You’re ready to take the next step in your search: putting the word out.

One of the most cringe-y activities I can think of is <insert dramatic movie music here> a networking happy hour.  First, because it’s hard to hear people talk over the din. Second, happy hours tend to be pretty superficial. And finally, all I want at the end of the day is to get home and unwind.

Happily, there are lots of other ways to put the word out.

Here are five to get you started:

  1. Have a clear message: I think it’s important to have a clear idea of the kind of job/company you’re seeking. “Confidentially, I’m looking for a senior director or VP role in a manufacturing firm that’s headquartered in the Twin Cities” is more actionable than “I’m looking for a new job”. Of course, if you’re not working and anything will do, your message can be just that. But assuming you’re currently working and that you have time to be strategic, clarity will get you farther.
  2. Start with your inner circle: Tell family members and close friends “Confidentially, I’m looking for a senior director or VP role in a manufacturing firm that’s headquartered in the Twin Cities”, followed by a question: “Who do you know that works for this kind of company?” Maybe they don’t have an answer today, but your question will have them thinking. Check back with them periodically to see what bubbles up.
  3. Touch base with former co-workers: maybe you’ve lost touch with them, but there’s a group of people that you’d love to reconnect with, and now’s the time. Use LinkedIn to find them. What are they up to these days? How can you help them? And of course, let them know, “Confidentially, I’m looking for a senior director or VP role in a manufacturing firm that’s headquartered in the Twin Cities” followed by “Who do you know that works for this kind of company?” Again, they may not have a contact for you today, but check back. And be sure to offer your help.
  4. Be curious about people outside of work: your network is larger than you realize, but maybe it needs a little cultivating. Notice and take an interest in the people you see at places other than work: at kids’ activities, at the gym, at sporting or cultural events, standing in line at the coffee shop, at church, during volunteer activities. Take an interest: What do they do? Where do they work? Can you connect them with anyone in your network?

    Dale Carnegie said it best: “To get what you want, help someone else get what they want.”


    5. Get yourself out of your comfort zone:
    no, I’m not suggesting networking happy hours (but be my guest if there’s one that calls to you!). Here are some ideas, though, for putting yourself in a target-rich environment: industry events, Meetup groups (find a topic that’s related to your career), focus groups, civic causes, fundraising for non-profit organizations. For best results, choose something that genuinely interest you. Authenticity is irresistible.

When you’re thinking about buying a certain kind of car, have you noticed that suddenly you see them everywhere? Well, once you start thinking about networking as more than a cringey happy-hour activity (and begin taking action), you’re going to find all kinds of interesting people. Some that will even help you get closer to that shiny new J.O.B.

Happy connecting!

If you’re NOT ready to begin networking (ie. you need help with professional branding), I’m your gal! Click here to get started on your new-and-improved resume + LinkedIn profile.

Not sure if we’re a fit yet? Let’s chat!
Here’s a link to my calendar for a no-pressure-no-strings-attached intro call.

Is Your Job ‘The One’?

(4 ways to find peace if it isn’t)

In every crowd, there’s at least one person who figured out what they wanted to be in middle school and never looked back.

But what if you didn’t (or don’t) have a strong vision for your career? Maybe you fell into a career path (or several) that paid the bills but wasn’t your true passion. It’s served you well. There are lots of aspects you enjoy, but you can’t say you’ve hit upon your life’s mission.

Do we need to find a work equivalent of ‘The One’ in order to be happy and fulfilled? I think not. Here are some thoughts and ideas that might help you relax:

1. Happiness is an inside job (pun intended).

A famous person once said, “Most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.”

We either decide to be happy and appreciate the good, or by default, we feed our misery. Which will it be? Say this to yourself: “Even though this isn’t my dream job, I appreciate the paycheck / people / short commute / stability.”

2. It’s a cultural habit to complain about work.

In the US, at least, people have a tendency to complain about their jobs. It’s an unconscious habit. But part of being human is the need to pay our dues in the form of work, unless you’re a trust fund baby or heir/ess. The problem with complaining is that whatever we’re focusing on tends to grow. If you truly have nothing good to say about this job, change the subject (and skip to #4).

3. If you’re bored at work, learn something new.

Ask someone to teach you part of their job. Volunteer for a new project or initiative. Become a subject matter expert. Attend a conference or trade show. Trade tasks (you give up something you dislike and take on something that a teammate dislikes). Take a class related to your work. Offer ideas on how to improve things.

As a baby copywriter, Alexandra Penney, former editor at Glamour magazine, created a list of improvements and turned it in to her then-boss. When she was called in to Human Resources (thinking she was going to be fired), they asked if she’d like to be promoted (she said yes). Challenge yourself to add value. Or keep doing your same old work, but use your spare time for creativity, education, or a side hustle. Do whatever it takes to keep your creative juices flowing.

It’s human nature to think the grass is greener somewhere else. There will always be a job that’s “better” than the one you have. If you’re an entrepreneur, maybe you love the freedom and creativity, but the hours suck and you’re the last to get paid. If you’re an hourly employee, you love the stability but hate accounting for every hour you work. There’s always something.

Decide to focus on the good and let the rest go.

Do you expect your life partner to be your sole source of fulfillment? Maybe your significant other hates sports on TV but you’re crazy for it. Do you stop watching because s/he won’t? Or do you cultivate a separate friend group for sharing this part of your life?

It’s the same with work: are you expecting your job to be your only source of satisfaction?

4. If you’re really unhappy, make it your mission to find a new job.

A terrible commute, a horrible boss or co-workers, a failing company or a toxic culture? Find something new and leave, ASAP.

If you’re really and truly unhappy, then by all means find work that’s a better fit. But that’s another post for another day.

In the meantime, decide to give your attention to all the things you DO like while you’re earning a living.

After all, what you focus on, grows.

 

Kryptonite Thinking

Maybe you just need to change your mind

There are times when life flows: appointments synch up, green lights beckon, bank accounts balance perfectly, and interactions with people of all kinds are a delight.

And then BAM! the rose-colored glasses fall away. What was flowing smoothly becomes an oozy quagmire. Interactions are jarring, sleep is disrupted, nothing seems to connect.

What happened?

Everything, and nothing. To paraphrase Max Ehrmann, author of “Desiderata”, “…no doubt the Universe is progessing exactly as it should.”

But if you have more jarring cycles than gentle ones,
the problem could be in your thinking.

What do I mean by ‘kryptonite thinking’? It’s the kind of thought that weakens resolve, rattles confidence, erodes happiness, encourages self-doubt.

Some examples:

  • Self talk: your inner voice loops on things you were told as a child: “You’re not good enough.” “You never finish things.” “Your butt is too big!” Or you’re frequently reviewing things you said/should have said/didn’t say and finding yourself falling short. OR (or!) you’re telling yourself how hard life is, struggle being a measure of worthiness (“I worked SO HARD for all this!”). Sigh.
  • Judgment track:  a running negative internal commentary on what others look like, do, or say.
  • Complaining: do you (even jokingly) natter on: about the weather, the traffic, the government, bad people, things you “hate”?
  • Comparing: looking at “what is” and finding it lacking: your salary should be higher. The house needs work. The expensive vacation was disappointing. Your butt’s still too big, even after all the dieting and exercise.

Here’s the thing:
Do any of these thoughts make you feel good?
Of course not. THIS IS KRYPTONITE THINKING.
It’s toxic. Stop it.

Stop it for two really good reasons: 1) feeling good is better than feeling bad; and 2) what you think about tends to show up.

A short explanation of how our thinking affects “reality”:

  1. All matter is composed of tiny packets of energy. These show up in either wave or particle form.
  2. Experiments have shown that these energy packets respond to observers’ expectations.
  3. When the observer anticipates the location and form of the energy packet, it obeys, converting itself from wave to particle.

They also act in surprising and random ways, sometimes even showing up in two places at once.

Weird but True: human thought affects the world.
= YOUR thought affects YOUR world.

Thankfully it takes a substantial amount of focused thinking + intentional, inspired action to change things here on Earth. But everything begins with thought.

“But won’t the world run amok if I don’t comment / judge / push back?” you ask. No, friend, it won’t. But you’ll feel awful.

The most insidious part is, once you decide how something is, you’re collapsing the quantum field (you know, the part where waves become particles). Instead of limitless possibilities, there is only the thing you decided on, and found lacking.

It’s easy to know when you’re doing kryptonite thinking:  you can tell by how you feel.

When you’re feeling glum and hopeless, or crunchy and judgmental, your thinking is out of synch with possibility. If you’re feeling neutral, at least you’re keeping the quantum field fluid. When you’re feeling happy (especially for no apparent reason), you’re in alignment with creative forces.

So talk nicely to yourself, like you’d speak to your kid or a friend. Watch your habitual word tracks: stop complaining, and if you can’t think of something nice to say… don’t. Pay attention to the ease we enjoy (electricity, heat, available food, water, freedom) and the beauty all around. Say thank you. Make a game of only noticing + commenting on the good.

Feeling happy ALL the time for fear of disrupting the creative cycle of the Universe is NOT required. It’s normal for feelings to oscillate a little.

But to uplevel your native inner state to a more harmonious one, all it takes is a decision to look at the bright side + a little (okay, maybe a lot of) practice. Declutter your thinking the way you’d clear out a closet.

Check in with your feelings.
Does this thought feel good? Yes? Keep it.
If it doesn’t serve, banish it.

Want more? Check out Pam Grout’s amazing bestseller, “E-Squared: Nine Do-It-Yourself Energy Experiments that Prove Your Thoughts Create Your Reality”.

You can change your life by changing your mind. I guarantee it.

I help mid-career professionals better tell their story.
I also offer 1:1 “Ask Me Anything” coaching calls.
Curious? Let’s chat.
Here’s a link to my calendar to schedule a free 15-minute intro conversation.

Search 101

24 recruiter-tested Tips for Job-Seeking Success

A fortunate few never actually look for jobs: they’re recommended by superiors or recruited by former co-workers. For the rest of us, here’s a toolbox of best-practices to make job-hunting easier and more productive.

On your professional brand:
  1. DO have a recently-updated resume. Especially if you’re a leader, have it reviewed and reworked by an expert
  2. DO have a recently-updated LinkedIn profile with a clear, professional-looking head shot
  3. DO make sure the dates and titles on your LinkedIn profile match your resume
  4. DO ask for LinkedIn recommendations from people who know you and your work well

Michelle spotted a LinkedIn job posting that looked like a perfect next role. Wisely, she asked around and found a professional who could review and revise her resume + her LinkedIn profile. Feeling much more confident after the resulting profile update and resume had been delivered, she applied to the job.

On figuring out where to begin your search:
  1. DO pick 5-10 companies you admire and for whom you think you’d like to work
  2. DO your research on each company. Using LinkedIn, find a common connection and ask for an introduction
  3. DO invite people in these companies for a quick cup of coffee near their office. Say something like, “I’d love to hear what you like about working at X. Can I buy you a quick cup of coffee?”
  4. DO ask people you trust for a recruiter recommendation
On networking:
  1. DO spread the word: let friends and family know you’re looking for a new company
  2. DO mingle: attend Meetups in your field of expertise (or ones that strike your fancy)
  3. DO look for and join LinkedIn groups in your profession
  4. DO expand your personal network by taking part in volunteer activities. Make sure to choose a cause that you truly care about

David is great at asking his LinkedIn connections for introductions. When he finds postings that fit his experience, he immediately looks to his network to see who can be an advocate. This has given him several opportunities to interview, as well as offering insights into these companies.

On applying to company websites:
  1. DON’T rely only on applying to jobs online, unless your skills are in high demand
  2. DON’T regurgitate your entire resume into your cover letter, if you’re using one. Keep it simple. Here’s a guideline.
  3. DO try to find an advocate inside the company as well as applying online
  4. DO tailor your resume to the job, highlighting the most-important skills
On staying the course:
  1. DO look for a job before you actually need one. 411 is easier than 911
  2. DON’T get impatient! Depending on your salary, it can take 6-10 months to find the right next position
  3. DO take consistent action so you feel empowered
  4. DO take good care of yourself physically and emotionally

Michael, who’d been off the job market for a couple of years, really enjoyed the networking aspect of his search. He took every opportunity to meet people. Along the way, he also made it his business to connect others and offer his help. His confidence, curiosity, and kindness added tremendous velocity to his search. Very quickly, he landed a great role with a Fortune 500 company and is now happily digging in.

On adding velocity to YOUR search:
  1. DO find ways to help others along the way.
  2. DO assume that things are working out for the best, keeping a positive outlook
  3. DO stay curious and open-minded. That job that doesn’t seem to be a fit could end up being best one in your career so far!
  4. DON’T allow yourself to get bitter, angry or desperate. These attitudes are repellent, and people pick up on them even when they can’t pinpoint what it is about you that is off-putting

Amy, who’s been job-hunting for 5+ months, is finding it hard to land one. It’s ironic, because the market in her city is hungry for people with her experience. She’s had phone interviews, but they never seem to result in face-to-face meetings. The problem? She’s tense and angry. The roles don’t pay what she expects to earn. Rather than adopting a curious and confident outlook, she’s bitter.

Your search can be a trial, or it can be an interesting and exhilarating adventure. By deciding to take the long view, asking for help along the way (+offering your help to others) and refining your job-hunting skills, you’ll be giving it the attention it deserves.

Happily, your results will reflect this.

Need some objective + experienced advice for your professional brand? I can help.

Here’s a link to my calendar to schedule a 15-minute, no-strings-attached call.

Need a Fast Start?

a Recruiter’s Advice for Today’s Job Search


Are you arriving on the search scene after a hiatus?  Some of my clients have spent a decade or more with their companies (some thought they’d spend their whole career there).  It’s easy to get focused on day-to-day life, with job+family overriding networking.

If you suddenly find yourself on the brink of a job change, these guidelines will help:

Evaluate Your Professional Brand
  • Get help with your resume & LinkedIn profile from a savvy friend or a professional. Putting your best (digital) foot forward is super important, not only for your brand, but also for your confidence.
  • Spend some R&D time reviewing job postings (LinkedIn, Indeed, Glassdoor). Figure out where your skill set fits. Job titles have evolved over the past 10 years.
  • Take an objective look at your appearance: do you need a more-current set of specs / haircut / interviewing clothes? I know of one outplacement coach who advises his clients to drop 5 pounds as a confidence-builder.
Get active on Social Media (LinkedIn)
  • More R&D: comb through LinkedIn to find former leaders & co-workers. Invite them to connect with you (if you aren’t already).
  • Change your LinkedIn visibility status to ‘open to opportunities’ so recruiters can find you. But don’t stop there:
  • If you’ve ignored LinkedIn (you’re not alone!), make it a daily practice to ‘like’ things that are professionally relevant. If you really like them, add a comment and/or ‘share’ them to your network.
Fire up your Networking
  • Think about where your next leader (or someone who knows her/him) might be found. Go there. Use Meetup.com to find professional events in your area of specialty. Attend regularly.
  • Get out for coffee / breakfast / lunch as often as you can. Invite former co-workers, people you’d like to know better, a recruiter or two (do your homework).
  • Regularly look for job postings (LinkedIn, Indeed, company Careers pages) that fit. BEFORE you apply, go to LinkedIn to see if you have a 1st degree connection at that company. If you do, ask them whether they’d be willing to promote you to the hiring manager / talent acquisition.
  • Don’t be a serial monogamist job seeker: have multiple lines in the water at any given time. This will help you from getting too attached to one opportunity.
  • Be curious about people you’re meeting outside work (at church, the gym, kids’ events, sporting events, volunteer activities). Find out what they do, where they work. If it’s appropriate, mention your job search. And connect with them on LinkedIn!
  • In addition to targeting a job / job title, talk to people to learn where the interesting problems (that you can help solve) are. Companies are growing, transforming, being born. Tap your growing network to find them.

It’s a brave new world out here in job hunt land. Social media has truly shifted the landscape. The old ‘apply and wait for a call’ doesn’t work. LinkedIn connections (the real kind) are golden , and it’s easier than ever to peer inside companies. There are even tools to help us assess cultures.

Here’s a quick article on bias-proofing your professional brand.

Looking for some help refining (or de-fining) your professional brand?
I can help.
Here’s a link to my calendar to set up a no-obligation intro call.

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