Katherine Turpin

Your Professional Branding Strategist

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Category: Recruiting

Ask a Better Question

When it’s time to change workplaces, the question most people ask is, “Where do I find my new job?”

We gravitate to Careers pages on company websites, search LinkedIn, or head to the job boards. It’s pretty easy to search for a title, spend a few minutes applying  / connecting / asking. The hard part is the waiting for a response. Lordy, the waiting is the hardest part.

But what if we changed the question? Instead of “where do I find my new job?” what if we asked, “Where do I find my new leader?”

I think looking for a new leader is a much more interesting proposition.

In the traditional sense of looking for a job, we match skills and requirements. The leader is kind of an afterthought.

When the new leader is a focal point of a job search, the skills and requirements are still there, but the whole question is elevated: who do I know that I’d love to work for? Who have I worked for in the past that I’d really like to partner with again? Who in my current circle of acquaintances knows someone? Who’s a thought leader? Which companies foster a culture of engagement and innovation?

Looking for a new leader could also mean finding a different leader within your current company. If you’re generally happy with your workplace but need a change, could you network internally onto a new team?

Or how about this: who’s solving interesting problems?

The only way you’re going to find out for sure is to start asking around. Sleuthing, making connections, following the thread.

Recruiters do this all the time ~ we find out where the fire is: who’s changing technologies | growing | shedding | transforming? That’s where the interesting work is.

Find that, and then figure out how to get their attention. Know your value proposition. Come with an idea of how the application of your unique skills and experience can contribute.

The most-satisfied seekers are doing more than just looking for their next job. They’re finding great leaders and interesting problems they can help solve.

 

I help people who are 10+ years into their careers better-tell their professional story. Struggling with yours? Here’s a link to my calendar. Let’s see if we’re a fit.

Recruiters: Friend or Foe?

Chances are, at some point you’ll have the opportunity to work with a recruiter, either as a hiring manager (for a fee, they help you find the right candidate) or as a job-seeker (they recruit you for one of their searches or generously share their network with you).

Two tips for engaging with a recruiter: “Be nice,” and “Be discerning.”

Be nice, because even though you might get more calls and emails than you’d like from recruiters, at some point in your career, you might need them. It’s easy to say, “No, thanks” or “Thank you, not now”, whether you’re a hiring manager with a job posted or a candidate with hot skills. That very same recruiter you hang up on today might be the recruiter for that job you really want five years from now.

There was once a hiring manager who seemed to take great satisfaction in slamming the phone down on any recruiter who happened to call. He became known for his rudeness.

The years came and went. He was promoted from manager to director. Things seemed rosy as his company grew and grew. But the day came when his very successful company was acquired. Suddenly, he needed to find a new job. But the recruiters remembered his rudeness and stayed away.

Be nice to recruiters. You never know when you’ll need them.

And be discerning, because not all recruiters are equal.

How do you find a good recruiter? The same way you find a good doctor, daycare provider or dry cleaner: you ask people you trust to give you a referral. Are you a hiring manager looking for help in filling a role? Ask other managers in your company, or others in your area of expertise. Google ‘IT recruiters in (your city)’. Look on LinkedIn. Then contact the recruiter and let them know what you’re looking for. Find out how they work, what their most-common searches are, and ask for some success and failure stories.

How do you choose the right recruiter? Here are some good questions to ask:

  •    What’s your specialty / area of expertise?
  •    What’s your process like?
  •    What are your most-common searches? Not all recruiters cover all types or levels of searches.
  •    How do you find your candidates? How do you find your searches?
  •    How many recruiters does your firm have? What’s their average tenure?
  • Do you have references I can talk to?

A good recruiter will have at least five years of recruiting experience and over 500 LinkedIn contacts. They’ll have a professional LinkedIn bio and a crisp, clear head shot. Take a look at their recommendations, too. Are they recent?

A good recruiter will want to meet you, whether you’re a candidate or a client. How can they represent you (or your company) if you haven’t met? They’ll spend at least an hour with you and ask a lot of questions. They may have suggestions on fine-tuning your resume or your LinkedIn profile (if you’re a candidate) or your job description (if you’re a client).

The best recruiters are not afraid to ask the hard questions. They’ll tell you if they aren’t the right resource for you. They’ll respond to your calls and emails, they’ll offer feedback and they’ll be in touch even when you’re not actively looking. They’re relationship builders. When you’re underway on a search, they’re responsive, and they show their leadership by offering best-practices and advice for success, whether you’re hiring or being hired.

Bad recruiters can be sales-y, irrelevant, ineffective and around only when you have something they want, but the good ones are worth finding and holding on to. A good recruiter will be your eyes and ears in the marketplace. If you’re lucky, s/he’ll be your biggest advocate and your secret career weapon.

Managers: You Found a Great Candidate…WHY Didn’t S/He Accept Your Offer?

Hiring is, in my opinion, a lot like dating.

To do either one well requires strong communication and self-awareness. The best candidates (like the hottest dates) are sought after. They know their value in the marketplace. They are typically attracted to a confident, clear vision, whether it’s another person or a company. Remember, candidates are watching how you operate as you “court” them. If your hiring process lacks cohesiveness, leaves big communication gaps, or makes you seem indecisive, they’ll assume that your business is run the same way.

Here are five possible reasons why your offer wasn’t accepted:

1. The interview process was discombobulated.

All too often, interviewers operate in silos. Some preparation beforehand will go a long way toward optimizing the interview process. Ideally, your recruiter, hiring manager/decision maker and the interview team (not too many, please, unless you want to drag the interview process out while schedules are coordinated) sit down ahead of time to prepare: what skills/experience & traits should the ideal candidate have?

What can you flex on? Who’s going to ask skills/experience questions (and which ones)? Who’s going to ask behavior-based questions? Debrief with your interviewers as soon after the interview as possible so you can update the candidate (even if it’s a ‘thanks, but we’re passing’). If your company uses more than 2-3 interviews to identify a hire, let the candidate know at the beginning of the process what the timeline to offer stage might look like.

2. Your interviewers didn’t sell the opportunity and/or the company.

There’s a fierce competition for strong candidates, especially in IT. For each candidate that you like & can envision hiring, several other companies are probably thinking the same thing. Keep in mind that candidates are comparing your company against others in the same way you’re comparing candidates against each other.

Remember to bring up authentic examples of why your company is the one they should choose (even if they don’t ask). Sell a vision, not a job description. Paint a picture (if you like the candidate) that captures their imagination and includes them. If you’re aware of negative buzz about your company (you can find out on sites like Glassdoor.com), be sure to address it.

3. You took too long to decide.

Maybe your vision for the position changed. Maybe it was a budget issue. Maybe you didn’t foresee interviewers being out of the office.

Whatever the reason, when a candidate goes long stretches without hearing from you (and a weekend can seem like a long stretch when you’re waiting), it’s easy for them to assume you’re not interested, even if the exact opposite is true. If there are delays, make sure to communicate them. Stay in touch even if you don’t have a timeline update. It’s okay to touch base without an update. It shows you care.

On the flip side, if you’re talking with a passive candidate who wasn’t job-hunting, deciding too quickly can scare them off. Be aware. Asking candidates about their timeline for a new job is a smart move.

4. You haggled over salary.

In my experience, it’s best to present your best, strongest offer first. Make it clear that you really want this candidate to join your team, so you’re making them the highest, best offer you can. Tell them it’s your final offer. Lowballing leaves a bad taste in your candidate’s mouth.

You want them to be excited (and flattered) to join your company. Be that company.

5. You didn’t keep in touch with the candidate during the vulnerable notice period.

After your candidate accepts your offer (if they’re working), they are faced with giving notice. This is a time when counteroffers rear their ugly heads. Also, your candidate may be getting competing offers from other companies with whom they’ve been interviewing.

Once your candidate has said ‘yes’ to you, stay close. Ask them if they’re worried about a counteroffer (and if so, remind them why they decided to say ‘yes’ to your offer). Ask them whether they’ve told their other opportunities that that they’ve accepted an offer. Don’t do all this in a fearful way, but in a positive “we can’t wait for you to join us” way.

While you wait out the notice period, invite them to a team meeting. Ask them to join you for a team happy hour or lunch. As their manager, maybe you take them out for a 1:1 lunch or coffee.

You (or your recruiter) should be touching base with them every few days, making sure the transition period is going smoothly and to keep reminding them of why they said ‘yes’ to you.

After they join your team, stay close to them while they get acclimated during the initial, “what have I done?” period, especially if they were in their last job for a long time.

Communicate, communicate, communicate! One of my favorite managers often stopped by to say “Hi,” and “I’m so glad you’re here!” during my first months on the job.

Even if you get all of this right, it’s still possible to lose a candidate, and that’s tough. My advice in that situation: don’t close the door. It’s a small world, and you never know what’s (or who’s) just around the corner.

But by asking yourself whether your company is making these five common mistakes, your hiring success rate will take a positive spin.

Good luck!

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