How Dieting and Job Searching Are Similar

In this issue of Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Pump Club newsletter, there’s a section titled “The Anti-Diet Diet Plan”. What it reports is there’s no magic bullet, no one-size-fits-all diet.

Here’s the thing: all successful diets have one thing in common: caloric restriction. Apparently it doesn’t matter what plan you follow (keeping away from highly-processed foods, added sugars, and refined grains, per the article). As long as caloric restriction is in play, the diet will give the same results.

It made me think of job hunting. Job seekers often tell me that they’re getting conflicting information from different sources.

I think job searching could be compared to dieting. Just like every body is different and one person’s keto doesn’t work for a high-carb fan, in job hunting you get to pick your path, experimenting and course-correcting along the way.

Since everyone’s path to finding a job is slightly different, influenced by the marketplace, their background, their network (or lack thereof) and what they’re seeking, there is no magic bullet, no ‘do this and you’ll find a job, guaranteed’.

The internet is full of well-meaning advice. Like: how many pages are appropriate in a resume. What’s the “right” way to network? Do I apply directly via the company’s website? Not apply and find someone inside to champion my candidacy? What about fractional work? Or work that is one-off or not the right fit? Accept it for the salary + benefits and keep looking? Hold the line and keep searching?

These  job hunting tips, tricks and tools have probably had beneficial results for their advocates. I used to be much more formulaic as I coached job seekers and those whose resumes and LinkedIn profiles needed tuning. But with today’s rapidly-shifting marketplace and innovations like AI, it’s impossible to offer a universal formula.

Like caloric restriction, the common theme in a job search is persistence and experimentation.

You could compare dieting’s themes of caloric restriction and staying away from added sugars, refined grains and ultra-processed foods to job hunting’s snuggling up with discomfort, staying away from unhelpful emotions like self-judgment + fear, and wondering when your efforts will ever yield results.

Speaking of results: if something is working for you (a five-page resume instead of a three-pager, for instance), keep it! Results speak louder than advice. You get to pick your path, no matter what advice you hear or see on the Internet.

Isn’t that liberating? Confusing and possibly overwhelming, yes, but also freeing.

So get on out there and try different things. Be curious, be willing to fall on your face, be told ‘no’ or ignored. It’s not personal.

Here’s the thing: you don’t know where that golden thread that leads to your next job is going to come from, so persist. On a day of blind alleys and bridges going nowhere, remember: the law of odds is in your favor (they teach this in sales). For every ‘no’, your ‘yes’ is one step closer.

Keep calm and carry on. You’ve got this.


Are you struggling with your job search & need an experienced recruiter’s perspective? Now offering one-hour coaching to those who want a magic bullet of their own. Use it for resume-turning, interview coaching, job search strategy-building, or mindset. Click here to book yours.

Copyright Katherine Turpin 2024. All Rights Reserved.




Tackling the “Slow Job Search” Blues | 10 Radical Actions

Job hunting is tough, no doubt about it. The seemingly endless cycle of scouring the job boards, looking to see if you know anyone at the company, chasing down leads, networking, applying, waiting, interviewing, waiting some more (or not hearing back at all) can be draining. Possibly the worst part is the uncertainty of knowing when your work will pay off. It’s a journey that can sap your energy and tax your spirit.

It’s crucial to acknowledge the difficulty, to embrace your emotions and even find solace among fellow seekers who share these struggles. Fear, frustration, anxiety, disappointment, even anger are all valid responses.

Yet,  what if there were a way to free yourself from the rut, inject some enjoyment into the journey, and uplevel your energy and spirits? If like attracts like, the potential benefits could be substantial. I’m not talking about toxic positivity, but a brief departure from the monotonous  “when will I find a job?” mindset – a break that can be hugely rejuvenating. 

As Albert Einstein famously observed, “No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that created it.”

If you are longing for a different perspective and a bit of lightness, here are ten experiments to consider.  Are you ready?

1. Think of the people in your network (professional or otherwise) who don’t yet know each other but who would get along famously. Introduce them.

2. If you’ve spotted a job that would be a great fit for someone you know, pass the job along to them. You could even let the recruiter know about your friend (with their permission, of course) and introduce them to one another.

3. Mentor someone – a STEM student, someone who wants to know more about your area of expertise (doesn’t have to be work-related) – find a way to share what you know.

4. Pick three values you cherish in the workplace. Write and publish a LinkedIn post about each of them.

5. Is there someone whose work you really appreciate? Write a LinkedIn recommendation for them. Don’t wait to be asked – just do it.

6. Start a new exercise or mindfulness program. Keep it simple and sustainable – like 20 minutes each morning. Stay with it.

7. Invite someone you know but haven’t talked with in a long time for a coffee or lunch, in-person or virtual.

8. Ask for help. Could be Silent Unity’s prayer line, could be your own spiritual community. Don’t go it alone.

9. Give yourself some time away from the job search. Go play. You get extra points for something you haven’t tried before.

10. If you’re not working, do some consulting or take an interim or part time job so you feel a sense of control with money.

Do any (or all) of these with zero expectations. Do them with an attitude of curiosity and fun. You’ll come to see that it’s not the actual results but the DOING that is such a powerful antidote to the seemingly endless WAITING of job searching. Plus, it feels good to connect with and help others.

What you’re feeling is understandable. But by elevating your thinking / feeling nature, you may see things in a new way. And maybe that could help get you to your destination (a new job) faster. At the very least, you’ll find yourself in a different level of consciousness.


Struggling to capture your skills and accomplishments on a few sheets of paper? Using my recruiting experience, I help technology leaders better-define their professional brand.

Want to know more about my signature Professional Branding Package? Click here.
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Copyright Katherine Turpin 2024. All Rights Reserved.

Getting the Interview | The Holy Grail of Job Searching


Most leaders I’ve talked with are great once they get in front of the client / decision maker. The problem is, how to GET that interview. It’s like the holy grail of the job search.

At the leadership or senior leadership level, candidates far outnumber open positions (think of a pyramid…yep, that’s you, at or near the top). You’re competing against peers, up-and-comers, and possibly even experienced leaders who are stepping back.

For every leadership search I conducted, we had  >100 applicants, WAY more than we could consider / screen / interview. Time and resources just didn’t allow it.

So how do you score the interview? Here are some suggestions to stand out:

Your Resume.

  • Tailor your resume  to highlight relevant skills, experience, and incorporate keywords from the job description.
  • Be results-oriented in describing your accomplishments. Use numbers, dollars, percentages, time savings, etc.
  • Give examples of successful projects, highlight your leadership experiences and their impact. Make sure what you’ve highlighted aligns with the job you’re applying to. You can even bold the relevant sentences to make it easier for the recruiter to connect the dots.

Your Online Presence

  • Make sure your LinkedIn profile is up to date (put bullet items from your resume in each of your most-recent jobs to provide context).
  • Use a current headshot. It doesn’t need to be professionally-taken, but it should be clear and well-lit. 
  • Take advantage of LinkedIn’s ‘Skills’ section (add yours), solicit endorsements from those who know your work, and be sure to mention your extracurricular / volunteer activities (40% of hiring managers consider this section as important as your resume).

Your Network

  • Your network is your most valuable tool in a job search. Past leaders and mentors, vendors, a trusted recruiter or two, former employees, and professional friends can all be advocates and resources as you search.
  • If networking still feels cringey, I recommend reading or listening to “The 20-Minute Networking Meeting: Learn to Network. Get a Job”. It’s a terrific guide.
  • Follow companies you’re interested in on LinkedIn (people who follow the company they’ve applied to are statistically more likely to be hired by that company). Check the ‘People’ tab to see if you know anyone who works there. 
  • Be visible: attend conferences, industry events, participate in online forums and communities in your area of expertise.

Your Body of Knowledge

  • Keep current with technologies, news, and trends in your space.
  • Consider writing or speaking about tech challenges you’ve faced. Sharing your knowledge is an authentic way to connect with (and help) others.
  • Enhance your credibility with relevant certifications, side projects, or volunteer work using your technology leadership skills.

Your Interest

  • After you submit your application, send a followup email expressing your continued interest. Best to send it to the recruiter, but if you know someone in the company who can influence the decision to interview you, follow up with them as well.
  • After the interview, send a thank you email to reiterate your strong interest and enthusiasm for the opportunity.

    Take a patient, positive, persistent and proactive approach. Gather feedback, test out different approaches, and iterate based on what you learn. Stay engaged with the tech community to improve your visibility.

Because you never know where that next connection (and interview) might come from!


Need some help optimizing your digital presence? I help technology leaders clarify their professional brand. Click here to schedule a FREE, no-strings intro conversation to see if we’re a fit.



Copyright Katherine Turpin 2024. All Rights Reserved.